Maintaining Your Furnace

The easiest way to maintain the efficiency of your natural gas furnace is by routine testing and repair. You can do most procedures quite easily, but at the intervals recommended in the owner’s manual, a qualified and licensed gas contractor should inspect and service your furnace; usually annually.a fantastic read offers excellent info on this.

Here’s what to do:

Note of safety: Before INSPECTING OR CHANGING FILTERS OR FAN BELTS, BE SURE TO SHUT OF THE ELECTRICITY AND THE FURNACE BREAKER PANEL FIRST.

  1. Replace or clean at least every three months, and hold the door of the fan compartment securely closed. Filters are placed in or around the furnace’s blower tank, and are normally protected by a clear film.
  2. If your furnace has a fan belt, check it at the same time as you adjust the furnace filters for cracks or signs of wear (and remove them if necessary).
  3. Keep ventilation and vents free from obstructions such as clothing, lint, pollen or pet hair.
  4. Check the chimney and appliance vent system at least once a year to ensure the pipe is securely connected, there are no signs of corrosion or damage, and nothing has fallen into the chimney base or into the flue.
  5. Hold focused on the field surrounding the furnace. Do not stack things on furnace. Do not place flammable products in a room with a furnace.
  6. If you have the furnace enclosed, do so with the help of a licensed gas contractor.
  7. If you have oiling points on your furnace engine, add one or two drops of SAE 20 non-detergent oil every heating season. Don’t over-oil!

Signs to warn:

When a furnace is malfunctioning there are nearly always warning signals.

The more popular ones are mentioned here …

  1. Frequent outages of pilot light (not all furnaces have pilot lights, test the manual)
  2. Delayed ignition (intentional pause of mid- and high-efficiency furnaces, test the manual).
  3. A fiery flame, or wavering.
  4. Excessive soot or corrosion (white, brown, or black streaks) on the appliance or vent system.
  5. So much sun, or too little.
  6. Every persistent or sporadic odor-like the natural gas odourant’s “rotten egg” or sulfur odor or a strong odor that may induce stinging of the eyes.
  7. Carbon monoxide toxicity symptoms: fatigue, vomiting, lethargy or other flu-like symptoms;
  8. Indications the furnace’s flame has ‘rolled-out’ – scorch lines from the door or other crack.