Olympic View Dental-Everything You Need to Know

A dental implant is a medical component which interfaces directly with the bone of your mouth or jaw to serve as an artificial tooth, bridge, crown, denture or to replace an existing tooth. The implant is typically created from titanium alloy that is fused into a surgical mold to form a durable, color-matched porcelain veneer that will fuse seamlessly with the natural bone. Dental implants can be used to repair or replace either one or more teeth. Since dental implants are fused into the bone, there is little need for surgical, open surgeries; therefore, they are considered to be less painful than dental root canal procedures. If you would like to learn more about this, please check out Olympic View Dental – Seattle dental implants..

Since implant failures are relatively rare, it is important to identify those patients most at risk for implant failure through a systematic review and patient-based oral health history. One such systematic review examined all published case studies comparing tooth implant failure with that of healthy subjects. Of the 8 cases included, five were from patients with a history of prior dental implants failures, two of whom had been on active dental implants for longer than five years. In these patients, the overall incidence of implant failure was significant (odds approximately 2%, especially for the implant failure associated with dental bridges), even after controlling for known risk factors including age, gender, body surface area and patient characteristics.

From this systematic review and patient-based dental health record, it is apparent that the risk factors for dental implants are best evaluated through surgical techniques rather than through common practices like dentures, bridges or crowns. These patients require very specific surgical techniques to facilitate the biomechanical properties of the jawbones and underlying bones to serve as support for the implant post. Further, the oral tissues must preserve or renew their integrity to ensure that the implant post does not slide out of place. Failure to do so could cause serious problems with the patient’s ability to chew and swallow, ultimately compromising his dental and overall health.