Understanding Truck Accidents

What are the common causes of accidents involving trucks?

Trucks come in all shapes and sizes. From 18-wheelers to smaller 10-foot capacity moving vans, trucks are unique to each classification. This implies that the reasons of vehicle collisions can differ, depending on the vehicle involved and the crash circumstances. website  offers excellent info on this. A stationary 18-wheeler pull off and destroy a car , for example, would have a much greater effect than if a multi-passenger bus does the same. Hence it is important to understand the truck variants and subsequent causes of accidents.

The following causes stem from a popular Find Law website. The reasons of car drives are split down into triggers and truck drivers origin.

Common unsafe acts perpetrated by car drivers near large trucks, often resulting in truck accidents, include:

  1. Running through the “No-Zones”-the places behind and alongside a freight vehicle where visibility is minimal to none for the truck driver.
  2. The change of lanes in front of a truck abruptly.
  3. Maneuver to the right of a vehicle taking a right turn.
  4. It misjudges the speed of an approaching truck at an intersection, and makes a left turn in front of the truck.
  5. Incorrectly merging into traffic, quickly causing a truck to maneuver or brake.
  6. Failure to slow down or accelerate when a truck starts changing lanes or merging.
  7. Unsafe passing, especially when not enough headway.
  8. Passing a tank, and getting pushed out of control by air or crosswind turbulence.
  9. Pulling into roadside traffic in front of a truck without sufficient acceleration.
  10. 10. Moving through large lorries.
  11. 11. Leaving a car in a traffic path, or struggling to move a damaged vehicle off the highway entirely and onto the curb.

Truck accidents Commercial Truck drivers have caused

Big rig and other commercial truck drivers are mostly experienced and patient drivers. However, besides the dangers inherent in the size and weight of the trucks used in commercial transportation and shipping, a number of business-inherent characteristics may contribute to traffic accidents. Including:

Insufficient instruction on driving methods, health issues and protective driving.

Compensation systems which encourage faster vehicle speeds and more consecutive vehicle operation hours than would normally be recommended.

Trucking companies’ unrealistic schedules and expectations which encourage drivers to hurry despite the safety hazards involved.

Car drivers typically trigger further truck crashes owing to impatience and misjudgment. On the other hand, although well trained truck drivers mostly cause accidents due to industry regulations and pressures on job performance. While these are two very different viewpoints, that doesn’t imply either that they are right or that they are not. Drivers, whatever their vehicle may be, should follow the laws and not take dangerous risks to hurry to get two minutes faster somewhere or to get a small extra incentive from their employer. That sort of behavior can be fatal.